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Fake News: Introduction

Fake News is in the News!

Fake NewsFake news has been a trending topic in popular media and the academic community. The popularity and quick dissemination of misleading, misinformed and false news stories in our social media feeds makes fake news harder to ignore. 

In this guide you will learn about the categories of fake news, how to identify fake news, and resources that will help evaluate news stories and news sources.

Image source: pixabay.com

Fake News Lingo

clickbait

"[Internet] content whose main purpose is to attract attention and encourage visitors to click on a link to a particular web page."

Source: oxforddictionaries.com

confirmation bias

"The tendency to interpret new evidence as confirmation of one's existing beliefs or theories."

Source: oxforddictionaries.com

echo chamber

"A metaphorical description of a situation in which information, ideas, or beliefs are amplified or reinforced by communication and repetition inside a defined system. Inside a figurative echo chamber, official sources often go unquestioned and different or competing views are censored, disallowed, or otherwise underrepresented."

Source: Wikipedia

filter bubble

"Customized results from search engines that are geared to the individual based on that person's past search preferences. It means two people searching for the same thing receive a different sequence of results."

Source: PC Magazine

hoax

"A humorous or malicious deception."

Source: oxforddictionaries.com

misinformation

"False or inaccurate information, especially that which is deliberately intended to deceive."

Source: oxforddictionaries.com

post-truth

"Relating to or denoting circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief."

Source: oxforddictionaries.com

satire

"The use of humour, irony, exaggeration, or ridicule to expose and criticize people's stupidity or vices, particularly in the context of contemporary politics and other topical issues."

Source: oxforddictionaries.com

 

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